bulletin witch

#42

:gotohell:

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#43

Try to take over save the world!

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split this topic #44

10 posts were split to a new topic: bullet winch

#45

Any promises of fully simulated ecosystems is very dubious now after so many letdowns

#46

To be this jerk fully realized ecosystems and then what? Look at it until you get bored. Bernband is this kind of thing and you play that for 10 minutes and then quit because anymore and you’d probably get bored.

The longer you stare at a magic trick the more you see the trick and less the magic. If I am going to go stare at something for two hours and go “that was neat” there are plenty of films that cost me a less time and engagement than a 30-60 dollar video game VR immersive experience.

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#47

bernband can be small and nice

software toys are cool, and VR is a good format for toys because you already don’t want to wear it too long, it is easy to support richer interactions than a normal game (touch, look, squeeze, pull – it’s crazy how a game character feels like a blunt instrument after VR hand controllers), and it thrives off things so neat you want to show other people.

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#48

you know what else has a fully realized ecosystem? the earth, and it’s boring as hell.

and the ecosystem is all fucked up anyway, it doesn’t respond correctly to player input.

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#49
#50

I’d have framed it more as, “Activision chooses to use creepy/discriminatory health services partner, as trend sweeps major American companies”, but yeah. HR departments seem to have poor scientific literacy toward claims that distributing FitBits and encouraging health goal tracking change behaviors rather than identify the healthy and not data-shy employees.

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#51

The past couple of years my company offered discounts on health insurance if we got blood tests. This year it’s the fit bit tracking thing. Is that an upgrade or down grade?

#52

The road to hell is paved with credulous readings of Cass Sunstein.

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#53

Oh yeah, we have to get “Biometric Screenings” every year for our health insurance and there are other discounting options and it’s bullshit. They will probably fitbit us at some point.

#54

Whoah, they’re up to requiring health data sharing at your place?

#55

I have never worked for an employer in Canada who was this eager to track my health. I wonder if this is more of an American thing, where private medical insurance covers so many more basic costs?

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#56

They can’t require it but they can levy a steep penalty in premiums if you don’t. It’s a feature of the ACA that they can have “wellness initiatives” that offer discounts but they’re functionally the same as penalizing people with bad vitals.

#57

America is the labrotory of corporate evil.

Also since Canada has a problematic but still appromately functioning democracy, it wouldn’t surprise me if it has done common sense medical privacy laws we aparently don’t.

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#58

Yeah, pretty much (it’s not required, but yeah, it is steeply incentivized). It’s greeeeeaaaat. I get to be the dude who is all like “haha yeah I am fucking over how much this costs” and laugh about it.

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#59

I am seeing some stories about this kind of nonsense in Japan as well.

#60

Oh, we have medical privacy laws out the whazoo (ask me how much I hate fax machines), we just invited the vampires in when we wrote our health insurance reform bill.

The ACA brought community rating which meant they couldn’t directly base pricing on medical underwriting but - don’t worry! - it opened the door to this just as the costs of monitoring and testing became cheap enough.

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#61

There is a fun field of study in how much the ACA fucked people over.