Short fiction thread

#21

I think everybody loves borges here

my copy of labyrinths has been my one constant go-to for ten years. ‘pillow and plate’, as someone smarter than me put it*

*jeanette winterson speaking of calvino’s invisible cities. same difference

1 Like
#22

The Blue Magnolia by Tony Ballantyne has a great Humphrey Bogart scene.

“I guessa man who lives his life alone is never really a part of the world.”

#23

i have his ficciones as something of a sporatic bedside-book for a few years now! i’m always having a great time reading / re-reading those stories.

on a different note i still need to finish kenzaburo oe’s short story / novella compilation ‘teach us to outgrow our madness’. some of the stories there are among the most visceral and heart-wrenching stuff i’ve ever read. really recommend It!

#24

Further lunchtime reading:

#25

Partly because repeated references to a “DAIS” made me chuckle

#26

I’ve been reading Clark Ashton Smith stories at night for the past few weeks. There’s an exhaustive collection out there and also a shorter, curated S.T. Joshi book. I decided to start with the latter and I’m enjoying it.

I wish that there were still something equivalent to Weird Tales magazine that I could subscribe to.

1 Like
#27

this is a pretty breezy story about the post-post-apocalypse. interesting angle and all. the audio version is also fun

“Logistics” by A.J. Fitzwater

1 Like
#28
#29
#30

Tulpa is irrationally obsessed with dissing Kelly Link, because he sees her as a representation of the disproportionately lauded Literary genre impinging upon the Genre genre and geting disproportionately lauded for wearing Genre-face.

#31

nah, its because she reads like Diablo Cody writing a ‘fantasy’ story in an MFA workshop

#32

To be fair to tmkf that’s what he just said

#33

I don’t think anyone would describe diablo cody as literary

#34

Diablo Cody would

2 Likes
#35

I’ve never been a big fan of Link and haven’t read her since college, but I remember liking what I read. Iirc, she suffered a bit from falling victim to that particular stilted 2000’s lit tone that is like, “I am doing art now. You know, like The Talking Heads and Laurie Anderson.” But I remember it not being too bad with her. People would call her experimental, but it was on the end of just being a bit weird in places.

I can see calling her overrated, but I think she represents too much of a bogeyman to Tulpa.

Also, he once responded to one of my short stories by saying, “I get that you’re doing a Kelly Link thing like your hero Kelly Link,” and it was baffling to me, because it was basically just a sci fi story that focused on people and was not at all experimental or “weird”.

#36

I never thought kelly link was experimental or weird is the thing

Like thats why I tried to read her but all I got was tepid “modern teenager speak as imagined by someone who has never encountered a modern teenager.”

Linklater-esque but occasionally zombies are mentioned.

Implying that I cannot understand a sci fi story that focuses on people is pretty condescending. Like you quoted a response to a story I linked that was exactly a literary sci fi story focused on people.

I dunno maybe you should drop this conversation. You’ve called me irrational and misrepresented everything I’ve said within 2 posts. Are you angry at me about something?

#37

If nothing else this conversation made me go back and read some Link again to see if my opinion would be different now. So I read this again because it’s a story that stuck with me:

https://smallbeerpress.com/free-stuff-to-read/2005/07/01/the-faery-handbag-by-kelly-link/

It’s like a Livejournal entry, not necessarily in a good way. But I like the premise. I like it less overall than I remembered, when I first read this it must have felt a lot more novel. I didn’t realize how old this story was! And how old I am now, sheesh.

1 Like
#38
1 Like
#39

I’ve been reading this enormous book lately, and it’s a fun collection. Although it contains a fair number of stories I’ve read before, most are new to me. I like that the editors included a lot of translated works from different cultures.

2 Likes
#40

I still haven’t finished the aforementioned anthology, as I’m reading it gradually around other books and primarily when falling asleep at night, but I’m finding that it really has some gems.

A few of the standouts so far:

  • The 1953 story “It’s a Good Life” by Jerome Bixby. This is the basis of the segment in The Twilight Zone: The Movie in which a boy can read thoughts and control matter with his mind. I found the Twilight Zone somewhat haunting as a kid, but the story is so much more distressing.

  • The 1937 story “Sanatorium at the Sign of the Hourglass” by Bruno Schultz. I mentioned in another thread that I coincidentally watched the movie not long after reading this story. Not realizing this at first only enhanced the dreamlike mood for me. Also, I just now learned that the classic Brothers Quay short film “Street of Crocodiles” was based on another story by Schultz. I will have to read that one.

  • The 1967 story “The Other Side of the Mountain” by Michel Bernanos. As much as I’d like to mention a few specific things about this story, I think I’m better off just recommending reading it blind.