lanthimos appreciation thread

#1

i just watched dogtooth last night and it’s great

also i’ve seen the lobster and it’s great too

so let’s talk about yorgos lanthimos

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#2

he got Olivia Colman an Oscar and gave Emma Stone an actual role at the same time!

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#3

everyone i know who has seen the favorite is raving about it. even the trailers got me interested and i normally detest ye olde angle-land period pieces. seems funnier than his typical fare?

#4

he basically plays it straight as much as necessary for the story and doesn’t hesitate to make 17th century courts seem as ridiculous as they are, the best approach to a period piece

#5

Dogtooth
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Lobster

#6

I loved both The Lobster and The Favourite. I’ve been meaning to see his other films, especially Dogtooth.

I thought the ending of The Favourite was the most impressive and original thing I’d seen on film since the bit in Twin Peaks: The Return when Dale Cooper’s translucent face was superimposed over a 15 minute scene.

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#7

dogtooth has a great ending because it resolves nothing at all

#8

in one way i recall feeling like the ending was like, just that bit too much like old mate scarfing that cake that will definitely make her sick, but it was also brilliant so that’s fine

anyway i’ve seen Fave and Killing of a Sacred Deer and the former was amazing and the latter really stressed me out lol

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#9

one thing i like about the lanthimos films i’ve seen is they are both deeply human (in that they are about the consequences of people’s actions and free will) but also fatalistic. he presents characters and situations that could only ever result in what happens, but it’s always because of the delusion or actions of the characters rather than a direct appeal to fate.

everyone in a lanthimos film lives by a specific, ordered set of rules particular to his films, and it’s exploring those rules that we get that thick narrative tension

he’s one of the few filmmakers that understands magical realism, i think. he uses absurd situations or fantastic consequences within a realistic character framework, and that the characters accept this hyper-reality without question both anchors the films and makes them even stranger

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